Wednesday, September 27, 2017

Please Welcome Author Nick Wilford with Excellent Writing Insight

Hi Darla! Thanks for helping out with my blog tour today. I’d like to engage your readers in a discussion if I may.

Darla: Splendid, Nick! Thank you for guest posting. I really enjoyed "Black and White" and am delighted to host you.


Why is it important to include some romance in non-romance books?
I’m the last person to count myself as a romance writer, and it’s not a genre I had read a lot of before I started writing books. But I have met some really excellent fellow authors who write romance, and seem to do something different with it. There are always new things to do in every genre; it’s all in the hands of the author. And it’s interesting when genres mix and mingle. When beginning to write Black & White, I didn’t set out to include the element of romance. It was something that arose naturally, and it did serve the plot. I don’t think anything should be included in a book just for the sake of it.
The world of my novel is quite grim on the face of it. Not because there are bad things happening – crime as we would see it has been eradicated, people have been conditioned out of it, and of course that’s a good thing. But the society is very sterile. Not just for the fact that there is no dirt or illness – things are hyper-ordered and regimented, with people eating meals and working out at set times. It’s as if the human touch has been lost. Marriages never seem to be particularly affectionate, and people also don’t extend that much love to their kids (only one is allowed per family). My two young leads, Wellesbury and Ezmerelda, both have friend groups that are characterised by quite a mean, cutting sense of humour. So the idea of romance blossoming between them was something that really helped offset this and offered some light relief. It wasn’t immediately obvious – as I said earlier, it wasn’t planned from the start. But right away I was intrigued by the dynamic between them. It was clear that Ezmerelda is smarter than Wellesbury – and smarter than her whole peer group, in fact, which irks them. But her intentions are always good, so hopefully it doesn’t irk the reader. She’s also the practical, level-headed one, where Welles is wide-eyed and optimistic. She’s great at taking his ideas and fleshing them out into a concrete plan, and she’ll also give him a pep talk whenever he gets discouraged.
So initially, this was more a case of two like-minded souls finding each other than something that was written in the stars to be a great romance. But then, I find the appearance of “insta-love” in books quite bothersome. At least give them a chance to get to know each other first. With Welles and Ez, their feelings developed after they had been through quite a lot of stuff together – some very adverse circumstances – and they started to realise that it really was them against the world. Hopefully this will make the reader root for them to succeed even more, especially when it looks they might not get the chance to be together.
All in all, I think a splash of romance is a great addition to any story. It can help round out your characters and draw the reader in. But just like our real-world affairs of the heart, don’t try and force anything. In fact, just get on with the main plot and if things develop organically – well, then it was meant to be. This will make for a much more satisfactory experience for the reader.
What are your thoughts on including romance in non-romance genres?
Title: Black & White
Author: Nick Wilford
Genre: YA dystopian Series #: 1 of 3
Release date: 18th September 2017
Publisher: Superstar Peanut Publishing
Blurb:
What is the price paid for the creation of a perfect society?

In Whitopolis, a gleamingly white city of the future where illness has been eradicated, shock waves run through the populace when a bedraggled, dirt-stricken boy materialises in the main street. Led by government propaganda, most citizens shun him as a demon, except for Wellesbury Noon – a high school student the same age as the boy.

Upon befriending the boy, Wellesbury feels a connection that he can’t explain – as well as discovering that his new friend comes from a land that is stricken by disease and only has two weeks to live. Why do he and a girl named Ezmerelda Dontible appear to be the only ones who want to help?

As they dig deeper, everything they know is turned on its head – and a race to save one boy becomes a struggle to redeem humanity.

Purchase Links:
Meet the author:
Nick Wilford is a writer and stay-at-home dad. Once a journalist, he now makes use of those early morning times when the house is quiet to explore the realms of fiction, with a little freelance editing and formatting thrown in. When not working he can usually be found spending time with his family or cleaning something. He has four short stories published in Writer’s Muse magazine. Nick is also the editor of Overcoming Adversity: An Anthology for Andrew. Visit him at his blog or connect with him on Twitter, GoodreadsFacebook, or Amazon.
Enter the giveaway for a chance to win a copy of my collection A Change of Mind and Other Stories or a $10 giftcard! a Rafflecopter giveaway

23 comments:

  1. A little splash of romance makes everything better :-)

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  2. Interesting stance. Personally, I don't think I've ever decided for or against stories. Most of my short stories don't have it but I've found that romance tends to fall together or apart in my head and hasn't been a big focus. Maybe I should try actively attempting it.

    Good insight all the same!

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    1. I'm sure you have excellent insight when writing. Do what comes natural. Happy Writing!

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    2. Yeah, probably not a good idea to force it. Let it happen!

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  3. I'm a fan of romance, but only if it serves the plot. Sometimes it doesn't work, and that can be a problem. But organically... Yeah, you're right. Any story can have elements of more than one genre.

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  4. I am extremely impressed by your quality of writing! I will definitely need to share your blog with my friends, thanks for the share!
    Gregg

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    1. Nick Wilford is definitely a talented writer.

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  5. Very nice post, well done and professional. I have pretty eclectic tastes in books, art, and music, but I am choosey within them. I am not a fan of romance, but I believe in love!

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    1. Kind words, Annie. Thank you. Nick has a gift, for sure. Be well!

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    2. "I'm not a fan of romance, but I believe in love." That's pretty much my approach!

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  6. Hi Darla and Nick - it's great that Nick is doing the rounds with his Black and White novel ... I think it'd be odd if there wasn't some type of romance in the story line ... after all boys and girls - it's the way of life and I'm sure living in a sterile society doesn't completely eliminate feelings ... cheers Hilary

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    1. It's like daisies growing between paving stones - they find a way somehow!

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    2. Thanks for the comment, my dear. And what a great description, Nick.

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  7. I used to read all the time. Was into romance books as a teen then I moved to "who done books"! haha....I love a good mystery and murder books. But I also love Vamp, witches and demon stuff. Scary huh? haha....I really don't read much these days but when in the car I really like having a book of CD. Although just yesterday I stopped by moms and grabbed three books, doing a weekend house/dog/bird sitting and since it is only two days I decided against taking crafts....I will be doing a lot of reading. Thanks for sharing.

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    1. I'd love a good couple of days to get some reading done!

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    2. Enjoy, Pam! And I hope you get the luxury someday, Nick, as long as you keep writing! ~grin~ Best wishes to you both.

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  8. The book sounds interesting. I enjoy those sorts of stories, where a society thinks they've solved every problem, by absolute control over undesirable aspects of living, only to have the dirt enter dramatically, and/or find its everywhere to begin with. Life is dirty and I like dirt!

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    1. Not sure I like dirt, though I'm not good at cleaning it up. ~grin~ At the same time, I don't want to live without it, either. Be well!

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Thank you for taking time to share your opinion. Hearing from readers adds immensely to my joy of writing!